Ecuador

Ecuador is aiming to secure additional financing by the end of August to help plug its fiscal gap after wrapping up a deal to restructure $17.4 billion of debt, according to Finance Minister Richard Martinez, Bloomberg News reported. President Lenin Moreno’s administration is negotiating a new program with the International Monetary Fund as well as some $2 billion in bilateral loans from China. Martinez said the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank is also considering a $50 million loan to support small and medium enterprises. “August is key,” Martinez said in an interview from Quito.

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Ecuador will extend the deadline for creditors to vote on its $17.4 billion debt restructuring plan to Monday following a lawsuit by a small group of bondholders, the finance ministry said on Thursday, Reuters reported. The South American nation originally said the vote would end on Friday, but pushed the deadline back at the request of the U.S. Court for the Southern District of New York following a suit by investment funds Contrarian Capital Management and GMO.

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Ecuador pushed forward with its debt overhaul plans on Monday, requesting a vote among its creditors on reconfiguring the terms of $17.4 billion of its external bonds, with its largest group of creditors backing the proposal, Reuters reported. Under the proposed deal - unchanged from the government’s earlier proposal - 10 existing bonds maturing between 2022 and 2030 would be swapped for three bonds due in 2030, 2035 and 2040, as well as a past due interest bond maturing in 2030.

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Ecuador is coming under pressure to sweeten its $17.4bn debt restructuring after some bondholders balked at the terms of the deal it presented earlier this month, the Financial Times reported. The country — one of the poorest in Latin America — said in March that it would be unable to repay all its debts as it deals with the fallout of Covid-19 and a collapse in oil prices. Earlier this month, the government announced a provisional agreement to cut and stretch out repayments, with the backing of the holders of around half of its bonds, including heavyweights Ashmore and BlackRock.

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Two groups of Ecuador bondholders have proposed revised restructuring terms to the government as it seeks to strike a deal to renegotiate $17.4 billion in debt, Reuters reported. The government’s proposal already has the backing of one group of creditors, holding around half of the bonds and including AllianceBernstein, Ashmore and BlackRock.

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Ecuador reached a preliminary agreement with some of its largest bondholders to restructure $17.4 billion in outstanding debt, Bloomberg News reported. The nation intends to exchange 10 existing bonds maturing between 2022 and 2030 for three new notes due in 2030, 2035, and 2040, reducing the average coupon rate to 5.3 percent, according to a government statement. The plan still needs to be approved by a share of the remaining bondholders.

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Investors holding several of Ecuador's sovereign bonds said Thursday that they had formed a committee to conduct talks with the government over a debt restructuring plan as the nation grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic, LatinFinance reported. "The committee is representative of Ecuador's bondholder base and includes holdings across each series of the bonds," the institutional bondholders said in a statement. The committee added that it has hired BroadSpan Capital and UBS as financial advisers in the negotiations.

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Ecuador is kicking off the first round of creditor talks this week with the goal of releasing an initial debt restructuring offer as early as late June, according to people with direct knowledge of the matter, Bloomberg News reported. President Lenin Moreno’s administration is pressing to avoid a hard default and to regain access to credit markets. The South American nation plans to convene a call with its biggest bondholders, including a group led by BlackRock Inc.

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Investors holding debt protection for Ecuador are in line to share compensation of about $60 million after the South American nation struck a deal with creditors to suspend coupon payments on its foreign debt, Bloomberg News reported. Firms holding the country’s credit-default swaps will receive about 65% of the amount covered by the instruments, according to the final results of an auction to settle the contracts on Tuesday. They get triggered when a borrower fails to pay its debt. Investors use the instruments to make negative bets on borrowers or as hedges for bond investments.

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