Chapter 15 Headlines

A judge affirmed packaged ice company Arctic Glacier International Inc.'s right to receive the benefits of Chapter 15 protection in the U.S. as its restructuring plays out in Canada, Dow Jones DBR Small Cap reported. Judge Kevin Gross of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del., Friday signed off on the company's petition for protection under Chapter 15, which allows companies to seek the U.S. court's recognition of a foreign bankruptcy case.
Elpida Memory Inc., the last Japanese maker of computer-memory chips, sought protection from creditors in the U.S. as it pursues a bankruptcy case in Japan. The Tokyo-based chipmaker filed court papers today in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Delaware, listing more than $1 billion in assets and debt. It asked the court to recognize the Japanese case as the main bankruptcy proceeding. Chapter 15 of the bankruptcy code allows foreign companies reorganizing abroad to protect their assets from creditors and lawsuits in the U.S.
Units of Berlian Laju Tanker, Indonesia’s largest oil and gas shipping group, filed for Chapter 15 creditor protection in a US bankruptcy court early Wednesday morning, The Jakarta Globe reported on a Reuters story. The company’s units have listed assets and liabilities in the $50 million to $100 million range, according to a filing with the US bankruptcy court in the Southern District of New York. Under US bankruptcy laws, Chapter 15 grants a foreign company protection from creditors looking to seize its assets in the country.
Arctic Glacier Income Fund said Wednesday it will file for a court supervised restructuring under the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act that the ice maker said could result in a sale or recapitalization of the business, The Globe and Mail reported on a Canadian Press story. The process has the support both of Arctic Glacier's secured lenders and two of its unitholders, Coliseum Capital Management and Talamod Asset Management, the fund said.
Mexico is studying international best practices for corporate bankruptcy proceedings after glassmaker Vitro SAB’s use of intercompany debt caused some investors to question the country’s laws, Bloomberg Businessweek reported. Vitro, which won a Mexican court’s approval this month for its debt restructuring plan, has called attention to a loophole in the country’s bankruptcy process that allowed it to use loans made to itself to qualify as its own biggest creditor.
Oilsands Quest Inc., which explores for oil in sand deposits in western Canada, is seeking protection from its U.S. creditors and shareholders, Dow Jones Daily Bankruptcy Review reported. Oilsands, which once did business as CanWest Petroleum Corp., sought the protection of a Canadian court last November. The Calgary, Alberta, company is now asking the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan to recognize the Canadian proceeding and extend its protection to the company in the U.S., where it faces three shareholder lawsuits.
Mexican glass maker Vitro SAB said Tuesday that a court in Mexico has approved its debt restructuring, but that it expects certain of its bondholders who have fought the deal to continue efforts against the plan, Dow Jones reported. In a press release, Vitro said a judge in Monterrey approved the proposed restructuring put forward by the conciliator in the case. The restructuring of $1.5 billion in third-party debt has caused controversy among bondholders, as it involves Vitro voting on an additional $1.9 billion in intercompany debt to secure the majority needed for approval.
Canadian foamer Domfoam International Inc. has filed for bankruptcy protection in the US after flagging sales and a million-dollar fine over price-fixing led the company into insolvency, PlasticsNews.com reported. Domfoam filed for Chapter 15 protection in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Toledo, where it faced more than a dozen lawsuits over the inflated prices it charged for its foam that goes into carpet underlay, furniture and bedding, according to a report from Dow Jones.
Struggling Catalyst Paper Corp. has received the go-ahead from a court in British Columbia to begin a planned restructuring, while at the same time filing for protection from creditors in the United States, The Globe and Mail reported. The Richmond, B.C.,-based company said Wednesday a B.C. court had issued an initial order under the Canada Business Corporations Act to begin the restructuring process. The plan would see bondholders take control of the firm. It would also reduce its overall debt by $315.4-million and cut annual cash interest payments by $25.5-million.
Two Congressmen from opposite sides of the aisle are calling on the Mexican government to take action in Vitro S.A.B.'s restructuring, which they say could set a "dangerous precedent" that will hurt investors in the Mexican glass company and future cross-border investment, Dow Jones Daily Bankruptcy Review reported. Rep. Jared Polis (D., Colo.) and Rep. Patrick Meehan (R., Pa.) sent a letter last week to the Mexican Embassy in Washington, D.C., warning about the danger of allowing Vitro's pending restructuring to proceed.