Canada

Philip Morris International Inc on Friday said its Canadian unit, Rothmans, Benson & Hedges Inc (RBH), was granted creditor protection, following a tobacco class action ruling in Quebec this month, Reuters reported. The company said it would deconsolidate RBH from its financial statements, and it cut its full-year 2019 diluted earnings per share forecast to at least $4.90 at prevailing exchange rates, from at least $5.28 in the forecast it made on March 4, shortly after the ruling in Quebec.

Read more

The Canadian subsidiary of British American Tobacco PLC has become the second Canadian tobacco company to get restructuring protection in the wake of an $11 billion Quebec appeals court judgment, with the company saying it is under "existential threat" from tobacco suits, Law360 reported. On Tuesday, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice granted protection to Imperial Tobacco Canada Ltd. under the Companies' Creditors Arrangement Act, staying the collection of the more than $6.8 billion the company expects it will owe on the judgment.

Read more

The head of SNC-Lavalin told the Canadian government it had to change its anti-corruption rules “as expeditiously as possible” in a 2017 letter to the minister in charge of procurement, just as her department was helping oversee public consultations on lighter punishments for corporate misconduct, The Globe and Mail reported. SNC-Lavalin chief executive Neil Bruce wrote to Public Services Minister Carla Qualtrough on Oct. 13, 2017, and sent copies of his message to seven other senior cabinet ministers. Mr.

Read more

Trichome Financial Corp., a company led by Goldman Sachs Group Inc. alumnus Michael Ruscetta, is readying a C$100 million ($75 million) war chest to dive into the business of debt financing for cannabis companies, Bloomberg News reported. Toronto-based Trichome is planning to raise between C$25 million ($18.8 million) and C$35 million of new equity, adding to C$15 million already raised by partners, managers and some investors, Ruscetta said in an interview at Bloomberg’s offices in Toronto.

Read more

QuadrigaCX, the Canadian exchange that claimed insolvency after the death of its founder two months ago, was granted creditor protection and a month-long stay of proceedings, Canadian media reported. With 115,000 traders hurt in the recent insolvency crisis, the company may be attacked by lawsuits, and the court decision is a way to diffuse the tension. QuadrigaCX lawyer Maurice Chiasson described the move as “an attempt to call a time-out.” In the meantime, the Nova Scotia police force has begun investigating the case.

Read more

For much of the last decade, Canadians have been told their debt levels were unsustainable and that their day of reckoning was fast approaching. Data recently released by the Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy (OSB) seem to indicate that day has arrived. According to the data, insolvencies by Canadian consumers were up 9.2 per cent in October 2018, compared to a year earlier, the Financial Post reported in a commentary. To say the least, these results appear alarming. But in light of what we know about homeownership and net worth, we are not so sure.

Read more

Sunrise Records, a Canadian chain of record stores, agreed to buy most of HMV Group Plc in an auction overseen by the embattled music retailer’s administrators, fending off a rival bid by retail magnate Mike Ashley, Bloomberg News reported. Douglas Putnam, who runs Sunrise and bought HMV’s Canadian unit in 2017, will gain control of 100 stores across the U.K., KPMG LLP said Tuesday. The remaining 27 shops will be shut down, putting 455 employees out of work.

Read more

Canada’s Supreme Court ruled on Thursday that bankrupt oil companies must clean up inactive wells, overturning lower court decisions that prioritized paying creditors and potentially raising the risks of investment in the industry, Reuters reported. The 5-2 ruling means that the Alberta Energy Regulator, which had appealed the earlier court decisions, can order the cleanup of inactive wells even when their owners have filed for bankruptcy protection. “Bankruptcy is not a license to ignore rules,” the court said in a written decision.

Read more

Consumer insolvencies are rising at the sharpest rate since mid-2016, according to a report by CIBC Capital Markets breaking down delinquencies across various types of credit, Yahoo! Finance reported. Benjamin Tal, the bank’s deputy chief economist, found the portion of Canadians who find themselves unable to meet their financial obligations is climbing 4.5 per cent on a year-over-year basis.

Read more

An increasing number of Canadians can’t meet their financial obligations, another sign rising borrowing costs are taking a toll on household balance sheets, Bloomberg News reported. The number of consumers seeking debt relief jumped 5.1 percent to 11,320 in November from a year earlier, the Ottawa-based Office of the Superintendent of Bankruptcy reported on Jan. 4. October and November combined saw 22,961 consumer insolvency filings, the most for those two months since at least 2011.

Read more